The Trip To Italy is a Refreshing Summer Get Away

49092ea0-bb16-11e3-a5c9-15546a228b64_5579159-low_res-the-trip-crop

by Carrie Specht

Summer is usually the time for big movies with lots of action enhanced by copious amounts of special effects and computer generated images. Or even high concept comedies that involve opposites who are irrevocably drawn to each other. And of course there are the silly, flamboyant films aimed at kids accompanied by gobs of marking products that inevitably end up making more money than the film itself. But sometimes, maybe once in a blue moon there emerges another kind of film, one that relies on content clever dialogue, and snappy repartee. Fortunately for audiences last weekend we experienced a “super” moon, which is even more rare than a blue one. On its trail comes The Trip To Italy, the delightful follow up to Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s previous road movie, The Trip.

thetrip240314wLike their previous team up, Coogan (Philomena, Hamlet 2) and Brydon (Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, The Rob Brydon Show) are on a regional exploration with the intention of visiting several restaurants, but this time they’re in Italy instead of the English Lake district (poor fellas, right?). They drive a lot and they eat a lot, and there’s not much more to the plot than that. The whole set up is just a really good excuse for two friends to talk and rant about whatever comes to mind. This might seem like a boring concept, but with the likes of Coogan and Brydon it’s a brilliant idea that allows for some moments of hilarious comedy that will have you laughing along as if you were a part of the conversation and endless bantering. It’s as intimate a film as you’re ever likely to see.

trip-to-italy The-Trip-To-Italy

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Boyhood – A Brilliant Concept Realized

4download.php copy.JPG

by Carrie Specht

Richard Linklater’s latest film is a remarkable and unprecedented must-see for anyone who has ever experienced the difficulties of growing up. No doubt you’ve heard about the concept of Boyhood, and how the story follows the progress of one boy as he grows, changes and develops into a young adult. Granted, the story itself is not so remarkable, however the fact that the actor playing the boy is the same person throughout the duration of the film is astonishing. The rest of the cast also remains the same all the way through the film. And since the plot runs from the time the main character is six until he reaches eighteen, means that all those involved on screen were committed to the project for twelve years. This level of commitment alone is worth celebrating, but what’s even more noteworthy is the fact that the film is good. In fact, it’s very, very good and is one to watch come award season.

image2resizeSurely, there have been other films that have taken a great amount of time to complete, but never with such anticipated and moving results as Boyhood. From the very beginning shot when we find Mason (Ellar Coltrain) on his back gazing into the sky (an image used for most of the posters) we sense the journey that is before him. But how do you trace a boy’s life? Is it by the momentous events that happen, or is it through the every day happenings that take on significance only when seen in retrospect? Fortunately, in this case it is the later. Linklater and his collaborators (the actors themselves) have crafted a storyline that is familiar yet special in its familiarity. I doubt there is anyone who can’t relate in some way or form to the troubles of a modern family and the complications that arise as life simply happens. It is this straightforward approach that keeps Boyhood on an even dramatic keel as it follows its inevitable course, and the lack of trauma is exactly what most audiences will find refreshingly appealing.

ellarmaster

Although the film is long at about two hours and forty-five minutes, I did not sense a moment when I was not completely involved with the drama on the screen. And even though the passing of time is noted in the growth of Mason and his sister (parents Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke remain remarkably unchanged – they must have portraits decaying somewhere) the impact of their overall growth by the end of the film makes a powerful impression. You will miss the children that they were and feel a pang as you realize they are literally gone, never to be seen again. This to me is one of the most lasting effects of the film: that the actor grew up before our very eyes and has immerged as a new person by the end of the film. I haven’t stopped thinking about the ending of this film since I left the theatre.

boyhood-movie-photo-2

There’s a particularly moving moment provided by Patricia Arquette not too long before the end of the film that sums up the message of the story and subsequently the role of parenthood (which could be the alternate title of the film had it not already been used for a Steve Martin comedy). Arquette as the mother is about to be on her own as her youngest sets off to college without fanfare or much regard for what or whom he’s leaving behind. She is relieved, sad, angry and frustrated. This is it for her life with her child. What happens next? Alternately we see the same question cross Mason’s face just before the screen goes to black. But the possibilities are decidedly different, and the future far more promising. The difference is in the perspective, and the answer is yet to be determined. That is unless you consider this film to be a prequel to Before Sunrise, which I think it could easily be. As good as it is it has earned the possibility. Knowing that, I don’t see how you can’t but enjoy the experience of seeing Boyhood.

 

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Rover is a Hard Sell but Worth Every Brutal Minute

_ROW7658.nef

by Carrie Specht

The Rover is an Australian film set in the not too distant future where some sort of cataclysmic decline in society has occurred. We don’t know how or why, but the world as we know it no longer exists and people now live in a dystopian state as dehumanized individuals that have little regard for human life. The film and its characters are very reminiscent of a few other films I can think of from Australia, such as Mad Max and even Walkabout. But make no mistake, The Rover is unique and packs a powerful punch that will leave you thinking of no other film you’ve seen before.

1400830342863.jpg-620x349David Michod wrote (with Joel Edgerton) and directed this sparse and lean chronicle of a man who goes after the men who stole his only possession: his car. Michod’s only previous feature film credit as master and commander was for 2010’s Animal Kingdom. Although this would qualify as his sophomore effort, there are certainly no signs of any slump. If anything, you could say that Michod’s second time at the helm is even more impactful than his first. As bare bones as the mise en scene may be every touch to the overall composition has an edge to it, creating an atmosphere as crisp and full of energy as any action pact scene from a summer block-buster.

The Rover

I liked this film very much, and have grown to like it even more, the more I think about it. However, I did notice multiple couples get up and leave during the screening I attended. Perhaps they expected something else due to the two stars, Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson. Maybe they thought it was going to be something more romantic, or funnier. Pearce is not your usual hero here as a man of few words and the scariest angry look I’ve ever seen in any movie. His unfaltering stares are powerful enough to make you squirm in your seat. And Pattinson is nothing short of a revelation as a (shall we say) mentally encumbered young man whose brother has left him for dead, and whose loyalty shifts to the one person who is actively using him, for better or worse. The accolades both men have been earning since the film’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival are certainly well deserved.

images-1

Make no mistake, The Rover will not appeal to everyone. But this small movie is an exceptionally well-crafted film that deserves to be seen. However, it will get lost amongst the gigantic releases populating movie houses during the summer months. So, you’ll have to seek this one out. Think of it as an artistic responsibility, or perhaps your own personal strike in a war against the commercial drudgery of films like The Transformers. Whatever your reason, see it and judge for yourself. My feeling is you’re going to be glad you did.

 

Posted in Reviews | 1 Comment

Flutter, a Film That Tells a Good Solid Story

A047_C014_0524V5

Flutter is one of those small independents that unless you’re looking for it is likely to get lost in the mass of summer releases and slip under your radar, and that would be unfortunate. Even at a festival I can see how the unassuming façade of this well produced little feature might not catch the eye of the usual attendee looking for the latest edgy story. However, if you take the time to seek out Flutter you’ll discover a little gem of a film that recalls the quality of the best productions of the independent world, films that tell a good story.

images

At first glance Flutter appears to be just another simple tale about a poor single mother struggling to get by with a young son who has some unusual medical condition (no spoilers here). However, not too long after the picture starts you’re drawn into the appealing story of motherly fortitude by the straightforward performances provided by the talented cast. Lacking the showiness of overwrought melodrama, Lindsay Pulsipher leads with her clear-cut depiction of a young mother going through the difficult day-to-day task of making ends meet in rural Texas. Looking not much older than the son she cares for, Pulsipher initially appears frail, but quickly takes on the persona of an iron willed force of nature that prioritizes her son above all else, but without shouting, crying or any other hysterics typical of films that don’t believe in the strength of their own tale.

Flutter_142157It may not be an unusual basis for a plot, but just like any oft-told tale it’s the execution that makes a difference. I was particularly impressed with how the film avoids portraying anyone as an out and out bad guy (although the mother-in-law comes close) or as an “ideal” character. Rather we see everyone with their warts and all, with complex personalities that exist as a matter of fact. The father-in-law (Glenn Morshower) is sympathetic but no hero, the son (Johnathan Huth Jr.) is charming but irresponsible, and even our heroine, the mother, is allowed a freak-out and moments of horrible judgment. And the temptation to add a love story is handled in an unexpected yet satisfying manner as well, giving a mature relationship an honest portrayal that does not end up being the answer to the female lead’s problems. Imagine that? 

A053_C008_0525XGThe other very striking element to Flutter is the stylized cinematography. Although the film is shot with traditional compositions, it is the whitewashed look that provides an almost ethereal quality to the overall mood, constantly reminding us of the hot Texas sun, the starkness of everyday life, and the lack of artificial conveniences in the world laid out before us. The cinematography is put to exceptionally good use for the little vignettes that act almost like bookends to the major moments in the film. Appearing almost as if they may have been improvised, these unguarded moments of play between the boy, his mother and his beloved pet pig (yes, a pig) provide delightful bits of character development without the use of dialogue.

Flutter-Johnathan-Huth-Jr.-as-Johnathan-and-Wee-Wee-last-play

I realize that most films these days tend to focus on either the special effects or supposed “edgy” material. But personally, I prefer a good story that is told well regardless of the pomp and circumstance. Such is the case with Flutter. I know I haven’t said a lot about the plot here, but I prefer seeing films without knowing that much about them, especially when they’re good. And Flutter is exactly that: simply a good film. Period. Why would I want to take away the experience of you discovering that for yourself? So, go forth and discover Flutter, a quiet and powerfully satisfying film.

 

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return Deserves a Chance

by Carrie Specht
Legends-of-Oz-Dorothys-Return-post-4

Two weeks ago the new animated film Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return opened and immediately met with audience trepidation and hostile reviews that resulted in a very low cumulative rating on Rotten Tomatoes (currently standing at just 15%). I believe these reactions are unjust and the film deserves a second consideration. Yes, by taking on such a revered story the filmmakers set themselves up for this kind of knee-jerk reaction, but if you listen to the naysayers you’ll be denying yourself the opportunity of seeing a truly charming film as entertaining as it is appropriate for the whole family. How many other films can you say that about this holiday weekend?

14I get the reason for the initial gut response. I too was hesitant to accept any telling of a story involving Dorothy that didn’t have Judy Garland and the rest of the 1939 elements involved. In fact, I would have thought it ill advised to even think of taking on such a venture. After all, The Wizard of Oz is one of the most acclaimed and cherished films ever made. Most people (although not everyone) has seen the beloved musical either on television, in a revival house or on DVD, and that Technicolor presentation (with a little bit of black and white) is the way generations have and will always think of Oz. Period. So, why even try to make something new? For the simple reason that it’s not the only Oz story out there to have captured the imagination of a generation of young readers. I know it might shock you, but there are actually a whole bunch of books by L. Frank Baum, let alone by his great-grandson, Roger S. Baum who picked up the storytelling mantle and created the book on which Legends is based. 

45_headerI had the opportunity of seeing Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return last November during the American Film Market in Santa Monica, California. Although I admit I was less than open-minded about the idea of yet another film attempting to depict an Oz based story, I was pleasantly surprised if not overwhelmed with the quality of the overall production value. From the animation to the star-studded cast Oz is a solidly made film worthy of high praise it has yet to receive. No, the animation is not “Disney”. But neither was Toy Story. Anything that isn’t what we’re use to takes a little adjusting to. However, I found myself accepting the style very quickly as the engaging story progressed and drew me in. Besides Dorothy (Lea Michele) and the expected trio of the Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion (voiced by Dan Aykroyd, Jim Belushi and Kelsey Grammer respectively) there are a delightful group of new characters such as the soldier Marshal Mallow (Hugh Dancy), an owl named Wiser (Oliver Platt), the China Princess (Megan Hilty) and the fearsome foe of The Jester (Martin Short).

legends-of-oz-dorothys-return-movie-wallpaper-34Honestly, all in all, Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return is a film that earns every cent of your admission dollar. Whether it’s animation you’re looking for, or action, or adventure, or fantasy, or a love story (trust me, it works) or even a 3D presentation there’s plenty of appeal for every generation of the family. And on a long weekend at the precipice of summer with the whole family chomping at the bits for something to do together what more could you ask for? I say see it. Given half a chance, Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return will not disappoint even the most ardent of Oz admirers.

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Great Gatsby, Even Better the 5th Time Around

The-Great-Gatsby-Movie-2013

by Zijian Li

The Great Gatsby is one of the most precious of American literature. It has been adapted to film multiple times (four time for the big screen and once for television), the latest version having been directed by Baz Luhrmann, an Australian known for Moulin Rouge and Australia. This most recent film stars frequent Luhrman collaborator, Leonardo DiCaprio as Jay Gatsby. In fact, the reactions of audiences toward the previous filmed versions of the story have been generally negative while the response to the original novel has been very successful. Regardless, the attempt by Luhrmann was still much anticipated particularly because of the cast, the promise of 3D, the utilization of CGI, and of course the opportunity to once again see a silver screen representation of the great novel itself. Without having watched the other cinematic versions, or even having read the book, this film definitely impressed me.

GG-06742r-1386x693First, this particular film did an amazing job (with its Academy Award winning Wardrobe and Production Design) of exhibiting how people in the time period of the flamboyant 1920s embraced and pursued the American dream, but with a unique and different angle than previously utilized. The development of Green Screen and Computer Image Generated techniques assisted in this achievement, demonstrating the excess of the “Lost Generation” on an exaggerated level that was until recently simply unattainable. At his time in the 1920s, America, as the World War I victor is celebrating its rapid growth in economy and the American dream was a key idea for society and youth. The film successfully sets the main character, Jay Gatsby as an epitome of all the pursuers who have reached success as seen through the eyes of another important character, Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) who represents of those who have just started the journey. In fact, it is Gatsby’s friend Carraway who tells Gatsby’s story in a first person perspective. This method works surprisingly well, allowing the audience to be spectators who look at Gatsby’s life objectively.

Screen-Shot-2013-05-13-at-8.42.23-PMDiCaprio as Gatsby is certainly brilliant. All the feelings of the character were vividly delivered to audiences by his finely tuned facial expressions and minute gestures. The character of Gatsby is one of a man who has always been struggling, striving hard to pursue his dreams while covering his real identity. Because of this fact, there is a very complex feeling to this character that might have been lost on a lesser actor. The sense that he is an outstanding individual who has been very successful in his career making millions of dollars cannot be left to wardrobe alone, and DiCaprio has the gravitas to exude this persona effortlessly. However, deep inside of his heart, the character feels lonely, insecure, and even ashamed of his secret past. Again, DiCaprio has the skill to impart such a nuanced performance. Which is particularly essential here since the mood of the film flows with Gatsby’s mood: when he is excited and happy, the atmosphere of the film becomes likewise. In contrast, when Gatsby is upset the film has a depressed feeling as well. DiCaprio handles this character extraordinarily well, making his performance, in my opinion, the most attractive aspect of the entire film.

IFInterestingly, the way Baz Luhrmann directed this film has draw much criticism, particularly regarding the many dancing and singing scenes which almost make it a Moulin Rouge type of movie. Suffice it to say, the film has a bit too much of the furious celebration. However, this over-the-top element contributes to setting a strong contrast to the love Gatsby has for his beloved Daisy (Carey Mulligan) and how people can be are heartless toward that expression of devotion. Another aspect of the film that has also created some controversy is the presence of musical artist Jay-Z as the executive-producer of the film’s soundtrack. It is quite risky to adopt hip-hop music as the background music of a film that is set in the 1920s, especially when the story is an American classic. But the risky choice pays off nicely, as I think the music fits perfectly into the film.

the-great-gatsby-img10Certainly, Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby made some bold moves in adding a lot of new factors to a piece of classic literature, generating many doubts and controversies. But by doing so it also differentiated itself from any other previous adaptation. Overall, I think if we could forget about the original novel and watch the film as a complete new story, this would make it a much better film for anyone who watches it, and very likely draw the accolades it justly deserves.

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Happy Camp Starts Well Enough and Goes Down Hill To A Horrible Ending

happy-camp-feature

by Carrie Specht

Some ideas for a film start out pretty good and for some reason just turn into a great big disappointment when you actually put them onto the screen. That’s the case with Happy Camp. Although I am not a fan of the “found footage” genre, the film had a pretty good idea that seems to have begun with the premis of a group of twenty-somethings documenting a friend’s return to his creepy childhood town where hundreds of people (including his little brother) have over the years gone missing. But sadly, the concept mutates into a found footage horror film. Like the residents of the remote Northern California town where the story is set, the production of Happy Camp the movie went missing somewhere along the way and came to a horrible ending.

Happy-Camp-2014-620x320When I first read about the concept I actually believed it was a real documentary about a strange little place where there have been nearly as many people who have gone missing over the years as those who currently live there (missing people over twenty years: 627, current population: 1100). I suppose I didn’t read the press release closely enough, or the misdirection is a clever part of the promotional strategy. Either way, I was intrigued and continued to be until about ten minutes into the film. That’s when I began to suspect the worst, and by twenty minutes in I was certain that the plot that once had great possibilities was nothing more than another imitation of The Blair Witch Project with a supposedly clever twist. Unfortunately, it was a twist that I feared was going to be pretty feeble. You will feel the same way the moment the group of friends roll into town in their fully camera equipped RV and see a larger than life image of a local legend. I won’t ruin that moment of stunned disappointment for you by telling you exactly what that tribut is, but I literally scoffed and said out loud, “oh, please no”.

maxresdefault2Although the film becomes rather tiresome once you realize the direction it’s going, the cast is for the most part very likable with the exception of the girl who gets pretty annoying with her increasingly frequent use of the expletive, “guys”! And in case you’re wondering the dictionary definition of expletive is, “a word that contributes nothing to meaning but suggests the strength of feeling of the speaker”. In this case it made the girl, Annie sound like a college girl mad at her buddies during a drunken party.

I went into this film wanting to like it. However, Happy Camp did a very good job of removing that desire from me every step of the way. Most insulting to the viewer is the sudden ending that appears to be attempting a shocking twist that you’ll see coming a mile away. You’re going to be hoping that the film isn’t going there, but your hope will be in vain. And worst of all is a what seems to be tacked on last few minutes that for the first time introduces the concept that everything you watched was found footage. Duh! Add in the cliched cue music (for those sudden scares), and the illogically selective use of camera angles from supposedly constantly running cameras and you have a mess of a film that could have been so much more if only a little more effort had gone into it. Happy Camp is one to be missed.

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Red Carpet Morning at the Oscars

by Carrie Specht

IMG_1643Today is an unusual day. Today is the day the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hands out Oscars for what they consider to be the best of the industry produced during the past year. Today was also the day I, and two of my production students spent the morning on the red carpet outside the Dolby Theatre shooting a segment for my site RetroSpecht.com. For most college students that’s an unusual morning.

That’s the two of them in the picture standing next to an oversized golden statue. They were acting as my crew as I oversaw my sister and her husband (that’s us in the next picture) as they reported on the tremendous impact Australian actors have had on the Oscars. That’s it that was our whole crew. That may seem small, but in actuality, most of the reporters populating the pre-show red carpet were either in pairs or by themselves pulling selfies with their iPhones and other portable cameras.

IMG_1656

Although it was early morning (we started at 5:30am ) there was a hive of activity happening all around us and it just got busier and more hectic as the morning went on. The feeling became palpable and an overall sense of excitement came over the entire area as the clock ticked closer and closer to the time where we were required to leave the area in order to make room for attendees, entourages, and the rest of the media hullabaloo.

IMG_1598

After driving into LA, finding a spot to drop our equipment and then park we spent an exciting two and a half hours getting the footage we needed. When we got to our spot just inside the entrance to the Dolby stairs it was notably busy, but by the time we finished there was a constant drone of sound tests, a steady rush of reporters whizzing by with hand held cameras talking about the famed Oscar staircase, and an automated recording blaring with information for attendees about which escalators to take to get to the Governor’s ball. It was an electrifying circus… and the real show hadn’t even started yet.

IMG_1591

Because our bit was to be a record segment to be edited with “B” roll pictures of the surrounding scenery we had to shoot many takes, or repeats of the same information. There was no way we were going to be able to control any of the action in the background, so we decided it was best to just go with whatever came our way. This included dealing with competing reporters standing so close we could pick them up on our microphones, and paparazzi helicopters circling above. It was rather impressive how our on air talent kept their composure through all of this. I think the Ugg boots helped. And a great big woolly jacket between takes. Of course our appropriately dressed reporter became so uncomfortable with the cold during part of the shoot that I stepped in as her double to hold the microphone during a close up on the interviewee. Sine the picture was framed in such a way that you couldn’t tell whether the original reporter was there or not, she took the opportunity to get warm, and I got my moment on the red carpet. It was an unseen moment , but it’s a step in the right direction.

IMG_1610

Unlike the on-air talent I was not dressed for camera. I never am. However, I noticed that most of the other camera crews were dressed to the nines with many members of the behind the scenes crew looking ready to jump in front of the lens at any time. I suppose this is  befitting of a red carpet event, and reflects a certain level of professionalism, but I think most of these people were either overly excited about being involved with the Oscars (even if only in a minor way) that they over-dressed, or they knew they were going to be interacting with the nominees as they arrived, so dressed for the occasion. We on the other hand had only limited passes that required us to leave by 11:00am. So we were never going to be anywhere near the stars.

IMG_1654No indeed, it wasn’t until hours later when we had already packed up our camera, had a good breakfast and driven back home that any of the night’s honorees had even stepped into their limos to head for the red carpet on which we had earlier been standing. But then this is only a first brush with Oscar for my two students. It’s entirely possible that they will have future opportunities to spend a greater amount of time on the red carpet, and in better outfits. It’s even possible that there will come a day when one of them will walk up the same tapestry without the need of a press pass before taking his seat as a nominee. And he will be calm and feel right at home. Because after all, it won’t be his first time at the Oscars.

Posted in Commentary | Leave a comment

Oscar Nominated Shorts in Theaters Now

Possessions

by Carrie Specht

The regular movie-going audiences generally overlook short films because usually there’s no sure way to see them. That is unless you happened to go to a movie in Los Angeles where one was linked with the feature film you went to see. Otherwise, short films are traditionally reserved for festivalgoers and even then it’s only those at a festival who go out of their way to attend a shorts program who see them. Fortunately, that has recently changed. For the past nine years the Oscar Nominated Shorts have been organized into a group presentation for public viewing, and this year is no exception. ShortsHD, the Short Movie Channel will be screening the 2013 Academy Award Nominated Animated and Live Action Short Films at the NuArt in West Los Angeles and at the Regency South Coast Village 3 in Orange County starting Friday, January 31. The films will be presented as two collective programs with separate admissions for each group, with the Oscar nominated Documentary Shorts set to open as a third program later in Los Angeles on February 14.

1367286094

The world’s only channel dedicated to short films, the Short Movie Channel (www.shorts.tv) is working with Magnolia Pictures to make this special presentation happen in over 250 theaters across the United States, Canada and Europe, with more than 400 theatres slated to screen the films during its theatrical release. These screenings will be the only opportunity for audiences to watch the nominated shorts prior to the 86th Academy Awards® ceremony on Sunday, March 2, 2014. After that you’ll already know who the winners are and have lost your chance at having an edge in your office Oscar pool. Truly a wide open category where anyone can win, this year’s nominated Shorts originate from all parts of the globe, representing the pinnacle of filmmaking from Japan, the UK, Denmark, Luxembourg, France, Spain, Finland, the UAE, Yemen, Canada and the United States.

noerame

The Live Action Short Film Nominees run about 108 minutes all together and include That Wasn’t Me, a story set in Africa amongst child guerilla soldiers, Just Before Losing Everything, which is a French film about domestic abuse, Do I Have to Take Care of Everything, a family comedy from Finland, The Voorman Problem a high profile effort from the UK that stars Martin Freeman, and what I believe to be the front runner, the Danish fantasy/drama, Helium. Each of these films has tremendous production value and is well deserving of the recognition, but there can only be one winner and my money’s on Helium. I’ll refrain from saying why because I don’t wont to give anything away, and I truly want you to see these films for yourself. More than likely they’ll be the best things you’ve seen all year. And no doubt, there’s bound to be a future feature filmmaker or two emerging from the group in the coming years.

mrhublot

Likewise, I was impressed with the Animated Short Film nominees. Running just a bit longer at 110 minutes, the diversity in this category is even more wide spread. With films ranging from the traditional to the innovative, do not be surprised if this is a tough one for you to make a conclusive call on. The first US submission, Feral is unique in its use of sketches and a style that suggests flowing watercolor. Whereas, the other US contender, Get a Horse is a product of the Walt Disney Company and uses a combination of old school Mickey with creative story telling to keep you laughing (honestly, you’ve never seen the world’s most famous mouse like this before!). At the same time, France’s Mr. Hublot has a dystopian whimsy that charms like no other nominee. Whereas, Possessions, a very styled entry from Japan is a feast for the eyes. And England’s Room on the Broom is a sweet tale with a sort of Toy Story-ish quality to its look.

shortliveactionwin_14

I recommend seeing these films in the theater while you can. It’s not often that you get the opportunity to see such high quality filmmaking with such entertainment value from all over the world. And they are shorts after all. So, if there’s one that’s not really to your liking all you have to do is wait a few minutes and something completely different will be along in no time. But I don’t think you’ll want to leave your seat or even turn away, not even for a moment. The films here may be short, but they have the power to hold a viewers attention with the full impact of a feature film, and then some. Given the choice of the typical offerings at the Cineplex and these short little beauties I’d pick the latter. After all, a satisfying five-course feast that out-entertains any single film far more deserves your hard-earned dollar than yet another potentially disappointing current release. You won’t be disapointed.

Feral

For a sneak peak at The Oscar® Nominated Short Films 2014 program, go to http://theoscarshorts.shorts.tv/

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

10 Live Action Shorts Advance in 2013 Oscar® Race

The-Oscars-e1381262416749by Carrie Specht

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences recently announced that 10 live action short films will advance in the voting process for the 86th Academy Awards®. This is out of the one hundred and twenty pictures that originally qualified in the category. That’s an impressive number, I suppose, but I would like to know if that’s an unusual amount, high or low. And just what do these filmmakers expect to get from all this hard work? Fame? Money? Well, not if they know anything about the filmmaking world. The best they can ever hope for is a pretty statue, one that represents the ultimate validation of their artistic endeavors.

www.indiewireBut the odds are stacked against them from the start. After all, if you break it down the chances for the current list of competitors is about a 1 in 12 chance of making the cut. Not bad, but that’s of all the films that officially qualified. That’s out of all the shorts that went to all the festivals that didn’t qualify, let alone the films made last year by eager short filmmakers that didn’t even make it to a festival. So now the accomplishment is somewhat staggering and far more impressive than the feature films that make it to Oscar night. I’m just sayin’ let’s give the short filmmaker some respect and give them their due when they walk the red carpet this March, whoever they may be. If one of the many commentators takes the time to interview one of these lucky few, please don’t take that moment to visit the restroom. And be sure to listen to their acceptance speech. In my experience these speeches tend to be the most sincere, full of heartfelt gratitude, becoming the most meaningful moments of the night.

kush-560x315

An added aspect to the Short Film category is its growing representation of the future of filmmaking on a global scale. The current list represents a broad spectrum of nations and cultures, which is not surprising considering the fact that other countries actually support the art of short filmmaking. Things are tougher here for the American artist who ventures into the unprofitable world of shorts. I mean let’s face it; there’s no true outlet for a short in the US other than the festival route. And that costs the filmmaker money to submit. Where as, in other countries there are supportive art councils and other government agencies, not to mention the standard practice of showing shorts on TV.

that_wasnt_me

So, if you’re going to make a short film in the US you better love what you’re doing, because the odds are highly against any financial rewards. Which is all the more reason to celebrate the hard work produced by these filmmakers who will truly mean it if they get the chance to say, “it’s an honor just to be nominated”. Heck, when all is said and done, it’s an honor to make the short list. Here they are in alphabetical order:

“Aquel No Era Yo (That Wasn’t Me),” Esteban Crespo

“Avant Que De Tout Perdre (Just before Losing Everything),” Xavier Legrand

“Dva (Two),” Mickey Nedimovic

“Helium,” Anders Walter

“Kush,” Shubhashish Bhutiani

“Pitääkö Mun Kaikki Hoitaa? (Do I Have to Take Care of Everything?),” Selma Vilhunen

“Record/Play,” Jesse Atlas

“Throat Song,” Miranda de Pencier

“Tiger Boy,” Gabriele Mainetti

“The Voorman Problem,” Mark Gill

tiger-boy

The Short Films and Feature Animation Branch Reviewing Committee viewed all the eligible entries for the preliminary round of voting at screenings held in Los Angeles. The members of this branch of the Academy will now select only three to five nominees from among the 10 titles on the shortlist. Branch screenings are being held in Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco this month. The final nominees for the 86th Academy Awards will be announced live on Thursday, January 16, 2014, at 5:30 a.m. PT in the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater along with all the other 2013 nominees. And then the Academy Awards for outstanding film achievements of 2013 will be presented on Oscar Sunday, March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. ABC will televise the event live to more than 225 countries and territories worldwide. Good luck to them all!

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment